Lao-Tze

Ancient China
-570 // -490
Philosopher

The Partial Becomes Complete

1. The partial becomes complete; the crooked, straight; the empty, full; the worn out, new. He whose (desires) are few gets them; he whose (desires) are many goes astray.
2. Therefore the sage holds in his embrace the one thing (of humility), and manifests it to all the world. He is free from self-display, and therefore he shines; from self-assertion, and therefore he is distinguished; from self-boasting, and therefore his merit is acknowledged; from self-complacency, and therefore he acquires superiority. It is because he is thus free from striving that therefore no one in the world is able to strive with him.
3. That saying of the ancients that «the partial becomes complete» was not vainly spoken:--all real completion is comprehended under it.

Lao-Tze, in 'Tao Teh King'
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